Ahmed Mushfiq Mobarak is a Professor of Economics at Yale University. He also co-chairs the Urban Services Initiative at the Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) at MIT, and leads the Bangladesh Research Program for the International Growth Centre (IGC) at LSE and Oxford. He has previously worked at the World Bank, and at the International Monetary Fund. He is a development economist with interests in environmental issues and has several ongoing research projects in Bangladesh, Brazil, Chile, India, Indonesia, Kenya and Malawi. He conducts field experiments exploring ways to induce people in developing countries to adopt technologies or behaviors that are likely to be welfare improving. His research has been published in journals across disciplines, including Econometrica, Science, The Review of Economic Studies, the American Political Science Review, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Demography, and covered by the New York Times, The Economist, Science, NPR, Wired.com, the Times of London, and other media outlets around the world.


Research Briefs

Migration
Bangladesh

SeasonalMigration - Bangladesh
Seasonal migration mitigates seasonal poverty by increasing incomes of poor households...

Sanitation

Bangladesh

Sanitation - Bangladesh
Limited access to improved sanitation facilities is a continuing challenge in the developing world...
Taxation
Bangladesh

Taxation - Bangladesh
Exposing information about firms to their peers can increase tax compliance and payment...
Agriculture
Malawi

Agriculture - Malawi
Leveraging social learning in communication can improve agricultural extension services...
Insurance
India

Insurance - India
Rainfall insurance can help farmers survive a drought year. So why aren't more using it?

Garments

Bangladesh

Bangladesh - Garments
Girls exposed to the garment sector are more likely to delay marriage, enroll in school and be employed..
Migration
Bangladesh

Migration - Bangladesh
Paying travel costs encourages farmers to migrate for work - and the effect lasts for years...